They bought the old bus off Craigslist for $1000

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The inside wasn’t exactly a place to call home.

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It was pretty nasty inside when they got it. Full of rust, rat poo and bird’ nests. I don’t think I’d have the stomach for this project.

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The engine hadn’t been used in months.

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And the electrical systems didn’t work.

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And they had never driven a bus before. None of this phased them.

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They started by drawing up a sketch of what they wanted for the interior floorplan.

They made some tweaks after they started the project, such as skipping the retractable table, but this sketch is pretty close to the final design.

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The family dog has fun roaming the bus while Tori, ChristopherStoll’s girlfriend, took out the seats.

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Tori removed the floor matting with an ice scraper.

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While Tori worked on he interior, ChristopherStoll got to work on the exterior.

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Some of the filters were more than 15 years old.

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The engine was a mess. A lot of things needed to be replaced, and the transmission needed to be rebuilt (at a cost of $3,500).

But after the work, the engine stopped screaming.

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They had to cut into the bus for wiring, plumbing and some venting.

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Next they installed easy snap and go type flooring, which they got form Home Depot.

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With the flooring complete, they took a moment to celebrate. Then they got back to work, painting the roof.

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With the painting and flooring done, they started putting together some Ikea furniture and started building a storage box for over the wheel wall.

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This was their first time adding solar paneling. He says they figured it out as they went along, but did make a few mistakes.

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The first arrangement of batteries was wrong (below) and it “nearly ruined the rig.”

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After fixing the battery set up, they added interior finishes. Like big comfy pillows.

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They built a cool bed setup with cabinets underneath for storage.

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They installed pre-made cabinets that they bought at Lowe’s by bolting the cabinets to the floor and walls.

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xt came the countertops. Along the back edge they used spare flooring.

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They had more spare flooring, so they used it as wood paneling on the walls.

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The most expensive part about the interior was the cabinets. Everything else was done with scrap wood and discount supplies.

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They were ready to take off for their first trip. Now they travel the country in it.

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They work out the bus, too. ChristopherStoll does concept art and illustration on his iPad, and Tori does the editing.

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Here’s an illustration he posted. That is some serious talent. Wow, right?!

Check out his profile on Deviant Art

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To help support themselves, they create and publish books with their art, such as The Natural History of the Fantastic, and Feminomicon.

You can buy both of them on Kickstarter, and see what other projects they may be working on.

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They have a toilet right behind the driver’s seat…but they say that they usually use the bathroom in the national parks and other places they visit.

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Here’s the exterior completed.

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And the beauty and possibilities of the open road.

 

ChristopherStoll says the bus cost them about $10,000 total.  For more details on the project, see the post on Imgur.  To buy their art, visit their Kickstarter campaigns.

To ChristopherStoll and Tori, we are totally in awe of this project.  We wish you all the best with your travels, and we wish you great success with your incredible artistic talents.

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