He found the space for his music room by carving out some of his basement with two stud walls.


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He bought a lot of Roxul Safe n’ Sound, which is “great and easy to install”.


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Next, he put up the door and started installing Roxul in the walls and the ceiling.


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Since it was a basement, he coated the walls and floor in Drylok paint.

Even though he wasn’t having water issues, he figured “better safe” than sorry in this case.

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For the ceiling, he added a plywood layer, which he installed in 2’ x 4’ sections since he didn’t have a lift.


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To give the I-beam a more finished look, he boxed it out and added Roxul with plywood.


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He then put up four new stud walls to form the inner room.


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For the entrance, he added two doors (not just one).


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Now that the room had walls and doors, he was anxious to start using the room while he worked on finishing it…so he added vinyl floors.


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For more soundproofing, he added Roxul to the inner walls.


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Next came a plywood layer to the inner walls.

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Over the plywood on the ceiling went mass loaded vinyl, with caulking on the edges.


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Next, he added isolation clips and a “hat track” in the ceiling.


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Then came the drywall on the ceiling.


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With the ceiling looking good, he moved on to adding mass loaded vinyl on all the walls.


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Then the first layer of drywall on the inner walls.


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He bought a bunch of Green Glue noise-proofing compound.


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And had some fun putting on the second drywall layer.

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The Green Glue made a nice gap to help reduce sound transfer.  He was skeptical it would work but at this point he was able to play the drums in the room without people hearing them on the second floor.

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Next he finished the drywall. 

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And primed and painted the walls.

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For recessed lighting, he installed soffits.

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He installed accent lighting on top of the soffits.

These are one of my favorite parts – see the color effects coming up.

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He added a great touch – the accent lights can be switched to different colors. Sweet.


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And they can even be controlled independently. Double sweet.


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He finished the lighting with drywall.


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And added metal trim to the drywall edges.


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The trim looked awesome, and it went throughout the room on the edges.


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For electrical, he put in conduit and electrical sockets.

 He didn’t want to make a lot of holes in the wall which he thought might cause sound to escape. 

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Next came in the bass traps.


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He added foam to the ceiling and the walls for additional sound-proofing.

 The panel behind the drums was removable so he could deaden the drums for practice or remove the panels to liven things up for recording.

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And here’s the big reveal of the finished room facing West. Awesome!


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Lastly, here’s the room with the lighting effects. This room looks like a dream!

Robbiearebest, hats off to you.   Your room looks amazing and it sounds like it sounds amazing too.

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